ONE INCH BADGE PRESENTS: ANOTHER SKY

Date:
Doors:
Komedia Brighton
44-47 Gardner Street Brighton, BN1 1UN
Price:ADVANCE PRICE TICKET: £7.00

Channelling the brooding atmospherics of Radiohead and The xx, but with a little more bite and political charge, Another Sky’s music is dark, cinematic and richly textured. Layering ambient guitars with penetrating bass lines and anxious beats, there is a thrillingly haunting quality to it. “We found it quite hard to strike the balance between hope and darkness at first,” admits Catrin, “because when I came to uni I was in such a bad way that, particularly lyrically, everything was really dark.”

As a child growing up in a small, middle class, right-wing town in the midlands, Catrin felt “like a complete outcast. I was super eccentric, super weird. It was a really homophobic and racist environment, and I was just that person who was like, ‘Actually, you’re wrong.’ I was bullied. I had a calendar of the days left till the end of school for like five years.” Music was an escape for Catrin. She’d listen to Tracy Chapman (another artist whose voice doesn’t adhere to gender norms) and spend every lunchtime in the school’s music room, practising the piano, rather than hanging out with her peers. That practice served her well, of course, but “I’ve had to learn how to be sociable. It hasn’t come naturally. I think I’m a hugely empathetic person, but I didn’t know how to…” Suddenly, she catches herself. “You know what? I’m not gonna blame myself. It wasn’t my fault.”

That’s Catrin’s defiant streak talking – a defiance that is inextricably woven into Another Sky’s music. Particularly the band’s new single, Avalanche, a brooding, biting indictment of toxic masculinity, with an eerily cascading guitar riff and jagged beat. “When you hold them to account,” Catrin chants, furiously, “they’ll spit you out, just a bad taste in their mouth.” “It’s about toxic masculinity bleeding into every other oppression,” she explains. “I had just read about another police shooting, and I was just so angry. The police force is predominantly male. You give people badges that say they’re untouchable and morally right, but then who holds them accountable?” When writing the song ­– one of the few she wrote almost entirely by herself – Catrin was also thinking about several friends who had been sexually assaulted. “I know so many stories of my friends reporting being raped and just not being helped at all. How demoralising, to have the courage to speak out, and then for the police to be like, ‘Well, we can’t help you.’ The song is trying to tie all oppression together. There’s this disbelief around women, and a taught violence around men, making them feel like they can’t be emotionally vulnerable, and then this anger builds up and damages everything.”

THIS EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE IN OUR INTIMATE SPACE – KOMEDIA STUDIO BAR

STANDING SHOW

AGES 14+ (UNDER 16s MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT)

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ONE INCH BADGE PRESENTS: ANOTHER SKY